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monarch butterflies’ migration is part relay race, part obstacle course — and full of dangermonarch butterflies’ migration is part relay race, part obstacle course — and full of dangermonarch butterflies’ migration is part relay race, part obstacle course

by:KJTDQ     2020-04-28
The life of the modern American butterfly is very difficult.
America\'s iconic insect monarch butterflies are shrinking in North America, and scientists are scrambling to unveil the mystery of their disappearance during thousands of kilometers of migration.
In last week\'s scientific analysis, researchers analyzed the survival threat of the famous butterfly.
They concluded that the problem was the danger of immigration.
Butterflies spend the winter in Mexico each year, then cross the United States and Canada in the spring, travel thousands of kilometers north, and return again in the fall.
But it\'s not individual butterflies that travel. It\'s a multi-
This is a relay race for generations.
The authors found that the biggest decline in monarchs could occur in the winter of Mexico, as well as in the process of moving north to Texas and Gulf states.
As it says, immigration mortality is creating a disconnect between the large number of monarchs produced in the United States and Canada and the smaller number reported in Mexico.
\"Immigration itself may be the problem,\" said James Perkins, professor of environmental studies at Cornell University and lead author of the paper.
In the past 25 years, the forests of Mexico where monarchs live have fallen sharply.
But during the long international journey, the butterflies faced many difficulties.
\"Every year, 20 million monarchs die in a car accident on their way to Mexico,\" Agrawal said . \".
Highways and cities across the United States split the butterfly habitat in two and reduce the proper stop area.
In addition, habitat loss, pollution, pesticides and climate change are also threatening insects.
During the break between the trips, the monarch is a mosaic of orange and black, often appearing on a tree and looking like a lightly flashing leaf.
The density of monarchs is so great that scientists and volunteer citizen scientists calculate the area of land they cover per hectare, not separately.
Monitoring monarch migration is a huge effort involving three countries, more than 4,800 kilometers, citizen scientists without Statistics, and large organizations such as the World Wildlife Fund and the United States. S.
Fish and Wildlife, and many Butterfly researchers.
Migration is not only a sight with wings, it is also a feat of navigation and biology.
How do they find their way through this long and complex migration process?
Monarch hearing and their internal GPS, the \"sun compass\", are active areas of research.
Andy Davis, an assistant research scientist at the University of Georgia, by gently placing the chubby striped column under a small sensor, let him and his team observe the tiny tubular heartbeat of the insect, to check the stress response of insects.
\"You can get something like a heart rate monitor in the hospital, you know: beep. Beep. Beep.
\"Doodle,\" said Davis.
Then he played the sound of highway traffic.
He and his colleagues found that caterpillars are no different from humans, and they will be distressed by the brief outbreak of traffic noise.
However, after a long period of noise, the caterpillar becomes accustomed or numb.
It is not clear what this means for the long time of the butterfly.
But the study, published in Biology Express last month, may be a mystery of their decline.
Monarch migration generation after generation.
Eggs that spawn in the Midwest will hatch into a tiny worm small enough to comfortably curl up on the m & M candy \"M.
Before it turns into a butterfly, it will grow and chew the Malinar greedily for a few weeks.
Then the butterfly will move a little south, spawn more and die after just a month of living.
However, the daughter of the butterfly is likely to live for eight months instead of just one month in the winter generation when she arrives in Mexico.
Aglaval explained that this
The living butterfly generation is different: do not lay eggs in winter, and do not eat malinches;
They drank nectar in the sun in Mexico.
After a seemingly long holiday, they flew to the northern states of Texas and other Gulf states to breed and die.
These next generations will return to their short lives and continue their generations to progress --
Stone moves north
\"If we take into account the human life span and make the last generation three times longer than your parents, it\'s crazy,\" Post-
PhD researcher at Penn State University, author of scientific research.
In recent years, the decline of Ma Lijin has been well documented and is another major cause of the decline of the monarch.
One of the challenges in the migration process in the Midwest and Northeast is to find the right habitat on the malingosteen plants.
According to Alfonso Alonso of the Smithsonian Institute for Conservation Biology, the increase in pesticide use in Nongda at the beginning of 2000 led to a serious reduction in malingosphere.
This plant alone is used by Emperor caterpillars for food and shelter.
Scientists, naturalists and citizens concerned about the matter are working to determine how best to restore the monarch to its former glory.
Since he has a malingoing in his Pennsylvania backyard, he can watch the monarch.
Now, there is no harm in growing more malinuses, but it is important to grow local malinuses. Non-
As the Monarchs continue their journey, the local horse milk grass is associated with disease and mortality.
The monarch\'s life is complicated by traveling thousands of kilometers a year and fighting the changing planet.
Butterflies are widely spread pollinators.
They are an important part of the United States. S.
A landscape with important links to Canada and Mexico.
Planting malinuses, reducing pesticide use and mitigating climate change are the main ways to aid monarchs.
Without international cooperation and cross-cooperation, it is impossible to understand this burnt orange bug
All the scientists interviewed were united by their passion for butterflies and their willingness to protect them.
The life of the modern American butterfly is very difficult.
America\'s iconic insect monarch butterflies are shrinking in North America, and scientists are scrambling to unveil the mystery of their disappearance during thousands of kilometers of migration.
In last week\'s scientific analysis, researchers analyzed the survival threat of the famous butterfly.
They concluded that the problem was the danger of immigration.
Butterflies spend the winter in Mexico each year, then cross the United States and Canada in the spring, travel thousands of kilometers north, and return again in the fall.
But it\'s not individual butterflies that travel. It\'s a multi-
This is a relay race for generations.
The authors found that the biggest decline in monarchs could occur in the winter of Mexico, as well as in the process of moving north to Texas and Gulf states.
As it says, immigration mortality is creating a disconnect between the large number of monarchs produced in the United States and Canada and the smaller number reported in Mexico.
\"Immigration itself may be the problem,\" said James Perkins, professor of environmental studies at Cornell University and lead author of the paper.
In the past 25 years, the forests of Mexico where monarchs live have fallen sharply.
But during the long international journey, the butterflies faced many difficulties.
\"Every year, 20 million monarchs die in a car accident on their way to Mexico,\" Agrawal said . \".
Highways and cities across the United States split the butterfly habitat in two and reduce the proper stop area.
In addition, habitat loss, pollution, pesticides and climate change are also threatening insects.
During the break between the trips, the monarch is a mosaic of orange and black, often appearing on a tree and looking like a lightly flashing leaf.
The density of monarchs is so great that scientists and volunteer citizen scientists calculate the area of land they cover per hectare, not separately.
Monitoring monarch migration is a huge effort involving three countries, more than 4,800 kilometers, citizen scientists without Statistics, and large organizations such as the World Wildlife Fund and the United States. S.
Fish and Wildlife, and many Butterfly researchers.
Migration is not only a sight with wings, it is also a feat of navigation and biology.
How do they find their way through this long and complex migration process?
Monarch hearing and their internal GPS, the \"sun compass\", are active areas of research.
Andy Davis, an assistant research scientist at the University of Georgia, by gently placing the chubby striped Caterpillar under a small sensor, let him and his team observe the tiny tubular heartbeat of the insect, to check the stress response of insects.
\"You can get something like a heart rate monitor in the hospital, you know: beep. Beep. Beep.
\"Doodle,\" said Davis.
Then he played the sound of highway traffic.
He and his colleagues found that caterpillars are no different from humans, and they will be distressed by the brief outbreak of traffic noise.
However, after a long period of noise, the caterpillar becomes accustomed or numb.
It is not clear what this means for the long time of the butterfly.
But the study, published in Biology Express last month, may be a mystery of their decline.
Monarch migration generation after generation.
Eggs that spawn in the Midwest will hatch into a tiny worm small enough to comfortably curl up on the m & M candy \"M.
Before it turns into a butterfly, it will grow and chew the Malinar greedily for a few weeks.
Then the butterfly will move a little south, spawn more and die after just a month of living.
However, the daughter of the butterfly is likely to live for eight months instead of just one month in the winter generation when she arrives in Mexico.
Aglaval explained that this
The living butterfly generation is different: do not lay eggs in winter, and do not eat malinches;
They drank nectar in the sun in Mexico.
After a seemingly long holiday, they flew to the northern states of Texas and other Gulf states to breed and die.
These next generations will return to their short lives and continue their generations to progress --
Stone moves north
\"If we take into account the human life span and make the last generation three times longer than your parents, it\'s crazy,\" Post-
PhD researcher at Penn State University, author of scientific research.
In recent years, the decline of Ma Lijin has been well documented and is another major cause of the decline of the monarch.
One of the challenges in the migration process in the Midwest and Northeast is to find the right habitat on the malingosteen plants.
According to Alfonso Alonso of the Smithsonian Institute for Conservation Biology, the increase in pesticide use in Nongda at the beginning of 2000 led to a serious reduction in malingosphere.
This plant alone is used by Emperor caterpillars for food and shelter.
Scientists, naturalists and citizens concerned about the matter are working to determine how best to restore the monarch to its former glory.
Since he has a malingoing in his Pennsylvania backyard, he can watch the monarch.
Now, there is no harm in growing more malinuses, but it is important to grow local malinuses. Non-
As the Monarchs continue their journey, the local horse milk grass is associated with disease and mortality.
The monarch\'s life is complicated by traveling thousands of kilometers a year and fighting the changing planet.
Butterflies are widely spread pollinators.
They are an important part of the United States. S.
A landscape with important links to Canada and Mexico.
Planting malinuses, reducing pesticide use and mitigating climate change are the main ways to aid monarchs.
Without international cooperation and cross-cooperation, it is impossible to understand this burnt orange bug
All the scientists interviewed were united by their passion for butterflies and their willingness to protect them.
The life of the modern American butterfly is very difficult.
America\'s iconic insect monarch butterflies are shrinking in North America, and scientists are scrambling to unveil the mystery of their disappearance during thousands of kilometers of migration.
In last week\'s scientific analysis, researchers analyzed the survival threat of the famous butterfly.
They concluded that the problem was the danger of immigration.
Butterflies spend the winter in Mexico each year, then cross the United States and Canada in the spring, travel thousands of kilometers north, and return again in the fall.
But it\'s not individual butterflies that travel. It\'s a multi-
This is a relay race for generations.
The authors found that the biggest decline in monarchs could occur in the winter of Mexico, as well as in the process of moving north to Texas and Gulf states.
As it says, immigration mortality is creating a disconnect between the large number of monarchs produced in the United States and Canada and the smaller number reported in Mexico.
\"Immigration itself may be the problem,\" said James Perkins, professor of environmental studies at Cornell University and lead author of the paper.
In the past 25 years, the forests of Mexico where monarchs live have fallen sharply.
But during the long international journey, the butterflies faced many difficulties.
\"Every year, 20 million monarchs die in a car accident on their way to Mexico,\" Agrawal said . \".
Highways and cities across the United States split the butterfly habitat in two and reduce the proper stop area.
In addition, habitat loss, pollution, pesticides and climate change are also threatening insects.
During the break between the trips, the monarch is a mosaic of orange and black, often appearing on a tree and looking like a lightly flashing leaf.
The density of monarchs is so great that scientists and volunteer citizen scientists calculate the area of land they cover per hectare, not separately.
Monitoring monarch migration is a huge effort involving three countries, more than 4,800 kilometers, citizen scientists without Statistics, and large organizations such as the World Wildlife Fund and the United States. S.
Fish and Wildlife, and many Butterfly researchers.
Migration is not only a sight with wings, it is also a feat of navigation and biology.
How do they find their way through this long and complex migration process?
Monarch hearing and their internal GPS, the \"sun compass\", are active areas of research.
Andy Davis, an assistant research scientist at the University of Georgia, by gently placing the chubby striped column under a small sensor, let him and his team observe the tiny tubular heartbeat of the insect, to check the stress response of insects.
\"You can get something like a heart rate monitor in the hospital, you know: beep. Beep. Beep.
\"Doodle,\" said Davis.
Then he played the sound of highway traffic.
He and his colleagues found that caterpillars are no different from humans, and they will be distressed by the brief outbreak of traffic noise.
However, after a long period of noise, the caterpillar becomes accustomed or numb.
It is not clear what this means for the long time of the butterfly.
But the study, published in Biology Express last month, may be a mystery of their decline.
Monarch migration generation after generation.
Eggs that spawn in the Midwest will hatch into a tiny worm small enough to comfortably curl up on the m & M candy \"M.
Before it turns into a butterfly, it will grow and chew the Malinar greedily for a few weeks.
Then the butterfly will move a little south, spawn more and die after just a month of living.
However, the daughter of the butterfly is likely to live for eight months instead of just one month in the winter generation when she arrives in Mexico.
Aglaval explained that this
The living butterfly generation is different: do not lay eggs in winter, and do not eat malinches;
They drank nectar in the sun in Mexico.
After a seemingly long holiday, they flew to the northern states of Texas and other Gulf states to breed and die.
These next generations will return to their short lives and continue their generations to progress --
Stone moves north
\"If we take into account the human life span and make the last generation three times longer than your parents, it\'s crazy,\" Post-
PhD researcher at Penn State University, author of scientific research.
In recent years, the decline of Ma Lijin has been well documented and is another major cause of the decline of the monarch.
One of the challenges in the migration process in the Midwest and Northeast is to find the right habitat on the malingosteen plants.
According to Alfonso Alonso of the Smithsonian Institute for Conservation Biology, the increase in pesticide use in Nongda at the beginning of 2000 led to a serious reduction in malingosphere.
This plant alone is used by Emperor caterpillars for food and shelter.
Scientists, naturalists and citizens concerned about the matter are working to determine how best to restore the monarch to its former glory.
Since he has a malingoing in his Pennsylvania backyard, he can watch the monarch.
Now, there is no harm in growing more malinuses, but it is important to grow local malinuses. Non-
As the Monarchs continue their journey, the local horse milk grass is associated with disease and mortality.
The monarch\'s life is complicated by traveling thousands of kilometers a year and fighting the changing planet.
Butterflies are widely spread pollinators.
They are an important part of the United States. S.
A landscape with important links to Canada and Mexico.
Planting malinuses, reducing pesticide use and mitigating climate change are the main ways to aid monarchs.
Without international cooperation and cross-cooperation, it is impossible to understand this burnt orange bug
All the scientists interviewed were united by their passion for butterflies and their willingness to protect them.
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